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Expanded Worldwide Planning
International Tax Planning

Stories
Part 1: Privacy

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Privacy is a key element. Wealthy families are looking for ways to keep their affairs private, and still be compliant with tax authorities worldwide.

What was once private and personal becomes public and accessible to all. Computers and other electronic devices are part of our lives, whatever our opinion of them. These devices can add convenience and efficiency to our lives, but at a cost.

At EWP Financial we embrace the Privacy Principle. The Privacy Principle is unique as it simply and legally shields wealthy families from unwished intrusions into their financial affairs. At the same time, the Privacy Principle is fully transparent and gives wealthy families a bespoke, compliant asset structure for all their holdings, wherever they might be throughout the world.

Electronic Privacy?

Andrew Grove, co-founder and former CEO of Intel Corporation, expressed the following thought:

“Privacy is one of the biggest problems in this new electronic age. At the heart of the Internet culture is a force that wants to find out everything about you. And once it has found out everything about you and two hundred million others, that’s a very valuable asset, and people will be tempted to trade and do commerce with that asset. This wasn’t the information that people were thinking of when they called this the information age.”

The ancient Greeks called man, “a political animal.” In today’s world almost all so-called facts are politicized. It is no different with privacy. Certain groups consider the journalistic authors of the Panama Papers and the Paradise Papers heros of a free press. Others say that these same journalists were thieves, who unlawfully stole private financial data. Whatever your opinion, these events did happen, and the targets were most decidedly wealthy families throughout the world.

How does the privacy afforded by a properly structured Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) policy protect the families whose financial information was published for the entire world to see?

The Privacy Principle of EWP accomplishes its objective in several key ways:

  • Upon transfer into the PPLI policy, the insurance company becomes the beneficial owner of all the assets in the policy;
  • If there is reporting to a tax authority for the asset structure, only one number is reported. This is the total cash value of all the assets in the PPLI policy. The individual assets are not reported;
  • The bank account that is usually opened in connection with a PPLI policy is opened in the name of the insurance company, not the policyowner. The policyowner has full access to the funds in the bank account in accordance with the assets inside the policy.
Part 1

The hot, dry night air seemed to smother the sleek, six passenger Cessna Citation XLS jet. The plane had just touched down on the tarmac of this isolated runway. Next to the gleaming white jet was a gigantic windowless warehouse. The eerie, yellow lights that protruded from the warehouse turned the body of the private jet the color of an overripe mango fruit.

As he emerged from the plane, Carlos Gutierrez felt the skin on his face tighten from the baking heat of the desert. He walked briskly to the newly completed warehouse and his cell phone rang.

He usually did not answer calls from unrecognized numbers, but he was expecting a call from his daughter, Lucinda.

“Hello,” he said. The voice on the other end was strangely familiar.

“Juan, is that you?”

“Yes.” said the now unmistakable voice of his best university friend. The voice was indeed Juan’s, but it had none of the joy and conviviality that he associated with it from university days.

“Carlos, we have your daughter, Lucinda.”

“What? I don’t understand. What do you mean?”

“Carlos, I now do the finances for one of the cartels that Lucinda wrote about in her article. We want ten million dollars for her release. We will not compromise. We want the money now. We will give you 48 hours to deliver it, and, if we don’t receive it, we will be forced to do other things to your beautiful daughter. I will call you in three hours.”

The line went dead.

The Privacy Paradox

In connection to privacy, there is a concept called the privacy paradox that was first discussed by Bedrick, Lerner, and Whitehead, The privacy paradox: Introduction, News Media and the Law:

“The privacy paradox is a phenomenon in which online users state that they are concerned about their privacy but behave as if they were not. While this term was coined as early as 1998, it wasn’t used in its current popular sense until the year 2000.”

The authors go onto to explain this in more detail:

“Some researchers believe that decision making takes place on an irrational level, especially when it comes to mobile computing. Mobile applications are built up in a way that decision making is fast. Restricting one’s profile on social networks is the easiest way to protect against privacy threats and security intrusions. However, such protection measures are not easily accessible while downloading and installing apps.”

Louis Menand excellently expresses the same thought in his New Yorker article, “Nowhere To Hide,” of June 18, 2018:

“How many of us are going to take the time to scroll through the new policies and change our data settings, though? We sign up to get the service, but we don’t give much thought to who might be storing our clicks or what they’re doing with our personal information. It is weird, at first, when our devices seem to “know” where we live or how old we are or what books we like or which brand of toothpaste we use. Then we grow to expect this familiarity, and even to like it. It makes the online world seem customized for us, and it cuts down on the time we need to map the route home or order something new to read. The machine anticipates what we want.”

Legal Challenges

There is also another type of privacy paradox pertinent to EWP in the reporting of data breaches and news reporting on wealthy families. This is aptly put by Filippo Noseda, partner at the Mischon de Reya law firm in London:

“It is somewhat curious that serious newspapers who have been covering both the private banking scandals and the erosion of privacy seem unable to make the connection between data protection on the one hand, and the Common Reporting Standard (CRS) and beneficial ownership registers on the other.”

CRS was initiated in 2014 by the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) with the goal of creating financial transparency between countries that have agreed to implement its directives. Beneficial ownership registers collate information about the beneficial owner of a financial entity in a registry for storage and use by enforcement agencies.

Mr. Noseda also draws our attention to published material by The European Data Protection Supervisor (EDPS) where he questions the OECD’s goal of total financial transparency.

Mr. Noseda writes: “As if they were living on planet Europa rather than in Europe, the European Parliament, the OECD, and politicians show complete disregard for the warnings raised by their own data protection bodies and instead appear hell-bent on introducing a system of total transparency.”

In October 2020, a client of the law firm Mishcon de Reya filed a claim with the district court in Luxembourg challenging beneficial ownership registers, and alleges that the ‘indiscriminate and generalized’ publication of personal details of individuals connected to family enterprises breaches their fundamental rights to data protection and privacy, and exposes them to ‘unnecessary and disproportionate’ risks.

We have grown accustomed to the idea that transparency is a good thing, something that supports the common good. Like many concepts, if taken to an extreme, it becomes its opposite—a weapon in the hands of governments hungry for wealthy citizens’ tax dollars. As proponents of EWP, we must question this overzealous approach to tax collection.

Part 2

Carlos weaved to the door of the warehouse, followed closely by his pilot and co-pilot. Carlos fumbled with the key and finally opened the door to the office warehouse. His long-time pilot and co-pilot functioned also has confidants and body guards, so he told them in Spanish what just occurred.

Carlos was educated mostly in the United States, having received a masters degree in electrical engineering from Columbia University in New York, but English was his second language. Like all of us in times of emotional turmoil, he sought some comfort. Presently the only solace available was to speak his native language.

The plight of his daughter was beyond devastating, but the next step he knew was only a phone call away. He would call his insurance broker. Carlos had purchased Kidnap and Ransom insurance for his family, since the Mexican drug cartels had recently moved into his native Michoacan state, seeking to legitimize their sources of income by terrorizing the local avocado growers. By means of intimidation and violence, they sought access to this lucrative agricultural industry. His family were third generation avocado growers.

What put Carlos into emotional delirium was hearing the voice of Juan, his best friend at Columbia University. Juan had been a model student, an honor student like Carlos, and a kind and generous person. His involvement in his daughter’s kidnapping seemed preposterous. He would not have believed it, if it weren’t for hearing his voice.

Carlos was meticulous in his financial affairs. His company had the ability to assemble the most advanced and sophisticated electronic components. He had become a billionaire in his early 40s through his design of innovative electronics for medical devices. He abided by the law, both in Mexico and the U.S. Carlos was proud to be a citizen of both the U.S. and Mexico, even though it cost financially to do so.

The last time he had spent time with Juan was after college at the family farm outside the city of Uruapan. They had climbed onto one of the old avocado trees, and to drink beer together and eat avocados. They were looking forward to launching their careers after college. He remembered the solid branches supporting them, the ripe avocados at their fingertips, with the dappled sunlight making the tree a private world of their own. He remembered the light being soft and multicolored like the light coming through stained glass in a church. They exuberantly discussed their prospects. Joining a drug cartel was definitely not on their list of future possibilities.

The Past Lacks Privacy

EWP and PPLI can further the aims of wealthy families seeking increased privacy, asset protection, and tax efficiency, but privacy, as we know it today, is a relatively recent phenomena.

We quote two eye-opening passages by Greg Ferenstein’s “The Birth and Death of Privacy: 3,000 Years of History…,” courtesy of Medium:

“Privacy, as it is conventionally understood, is only 150 years old. Most humans living throughout history had little concept of privacy in their tiny communities. Sex, breastfeeding, and bathings were shamelessly performed in front of friends and families.”

“Privacy-conscious citizens did find more traction with what would become perhaps America’s first privacy law, the 1710 Post Office Act, which banned sorting through the mail by postal employees.”

This last quote seems quaint in light of the large-scale, present-day concerns of unauthorized data sharing by social media sites. The Privacy Principle was created to give wealthy families enhanced privacy. Our firm can be confident of our success, because EWP asset structuring greatly simplifies the process, and in addition, gives you the privacy that you seek.

The Dangerous Mouse Click

An adroit insider in the world of data breaches gives us frightening insights into how easily our personal data can be exposed and made public.

Lucia Vazquez,’s “A Millionaire Hacker’s Lessons for Corporate America,” for the Wall Street Journal, October 3, 2020 tells us:

“Santiago Lopez started invading corporate computer systems at age 16, after he learned to hack from YouTube videos and like-minded friends.

Now 21, he says he never wanted to commit crimes. Rather, he is a bounty hunter, invited by companies to find holes in their business networks and burrow into their vulnerable data. The idea is that a company will then fix what’s wrong to harden itself against bad actors—“black-hat” hackers—looking to steal data, conduct espionage and disrupt business operations. Like others in a stable of “white-hat” attack experts associated with bug-bounty firm HackerOne, Mr. Lopez gets paid commensurate with the severity of the weaknesses he identifies. He and other members swarm applications and websites to look for security holes missed by customers that contract with the San Francisco-based firm. Big problems pay big money.”

In the same article, Ms. Vasquez asked these two important questions to Mr. Lopez:

You’re really effective at what you do. What does this say about corporate cybersecurity?

They’re not investing money or time or work in trying to grow their cybersecurity team. A lot of companies, if you report bugs to them, they don’t have the expertise to fix them. Software that they build themselves has more bugs but software generally is vulnerable, always. If software has access to important data, then encrypt it.

What kinds of technology changes are coming that will create cybersecurity problems?

Artificial intelligence has helped us a lot to optimize tasks, process data and make decisions much faster than a human being could. However, new technologies, including artificial intelligence, create big cybersecurity risks, as potential vulnerabilities are not fully understood when they are found. This means that with more organizations relying on machine learning to perform business-critical actions, AI systems are sure to become a major target for hackers.”

Part 3

Diego wondered how he was to receive his bribe. He was told by his contact to buy a burner phone on Wednesday, and throw it away that evening after he received a text. His contact had booked him a table for 7pm at the Bellini Restaurant, atop the World Trade Center on the 45th floor in Mexico City.

“Good evening, sir,” said the handsome young man in his well-tailored valet parking uniform.

His car door was politely closed, and Diego pulled away, feeling somewhat sheepish and out of place with his old Prius at this expensive restaurant in Mexico City. The Bellini was an uncomfortable experience for Diego. This showed in the perspiration draining down his shirt from below his armpits. In his highly excited state, he had forgotten to put on deodorant this morning.

He had barely noticed the dazzling lights that lay below him, as he ate but did not taste the exquisite meal that was paid for by his contact. The restaurant magically revolved, but he might as well have been facing a blank wall. Diego only thought of one thing, and one thing only: “Will I get paid, or will they kill me instead.”

As he was traveling toward his small apartment, he received a text, Look in the glove box, then destroy your phone. I mean destroy it completely.

Diego opened the glove box to find a plain manilla envelope, which he tore open to find cash. Plenty of cash. 400,000 pesos, about $20,000U.S. The equivalent of his annual salary.

Why were 400,000 pesos put in his glove box? The reason was simple. Diego worked at the Servicio de Administración Tributaria (SAT). The SAT is the revenue service of the Mexican federal government. Diego had access to information that the cartel wanted to destroy Carlos Guittierez.

A new law had come into effect January 1, 2020, and stipulates that tax evasion will turn into a charge of organized crime if three or more people are aware of a scheme, which could result in companies being held criminally liable. Diego had access to salient information in Mexico’s Register of Beneficial Ownership. The cartel was going to use this information to charge Carlos under this new law.

How ironic that a successful businessman like Carlos could be discredited by an organized crime cartel when he went to great lengths to comply with all of Mexico’s laws. In a sinister way, the designs of Carlos’s intricate electronic components mirrored the devious, deceptive, and criminal practices of the cartel. One was used for good, and the other to destroy an innocent man.

Corporate Cybersecurity Amis

Large corporate data breaches have become almost commonplace in recent years. Here are a few courtesy of Dan Swinhoe from CSO, April 17, 2020:

Yahoo

Date: 2013-14

Impact: 3 billion user accounts

Details: Yahoo announced in September 2016 that in 2014 it had been the victim of what would be the biggest data breach in history. The attackers, which the company believed were “state-sponsored actors,” compromised the real names, email addresses, dates of birth and telephone numbers of 500 million users. Yahoo claimed that most of the compromised passwords were hashed.

LinkedIn

Date: 2012 (and 2016)

Impact: 165 million user accounts

Details: As the major social network for business professionals, LinkedIn has become an attractive proposition for attackers looking to conduct social engineering attacks. However, it has also fallen victim to leaking user data in the past.

Equifax

Date: July 29, 2017

Impact: 147.9 million consumers

Details: Equifax, one of the largest credit bureaus in the US, said on Sept. 7, 2017 that an application vulnerability in one of their websites led to a data breach that exposed about 147.9 million consumers. The breach was discovered on July 29, but the company says that it likely started in mid-May. The breach compromised the personal information (including Social Security numbers, birth dates, addresses, and in some cases drivers’ license numbers) of 143 million consumers; 209,000 consumers also had their credit card data exposed. That number was raised to 147.9 million in October 2017.”

These large corporate data breaches might seem impersonal and far off, unless you were one of the victims. We finish this section with a more sinister example, that highlights the vulnerable interfaces of our technologically dependent world. This example is again from Mr. Menand’s thoughtful New Yorker article quoted from earlier:

“An Oregon couple’s domestic conversation (about hardwood floors, they said) was recorded by Echo, Amazon’s “smart speaker” for the home, which sent it as an audio file to one of the husband’s employees. Amazon called the event “an extremely rare occurrence”—that is, not a systemic security issue.”

Part 4

One week later Carlos Gutierrez found it difficult to pursue life in his usual diligent and focused manner. His daughter Lucinda had been returned by the cartel, unharmed physically, but shaken to the core psychologically. Carlos was now flying back from San Jose to one of his homes near La Jolla in southern California.

He requested that they take a route directly south from Santa Barbara, over the Channel Islands, only veering west after San Clemente Island. It was the most common route when he flew commercially before he could afford to keep two jets. Carlos was attempting to re-establish some order in his life.

Before the kidnapping and the lawsuit, he and his family inhabited a sane and orderly world, cut off from the concerns of those outside this thin bubble. When it burst more illusions escaped than he had ever thought possible. He could repair things with money, but money alone could not repair his family’s current emotional devastation.

One of his business strengths was the ability to inspire those who could put his creative electrical engineering concepts into integrated circuits and the other components of his medical devices. In San Jose he had visited a shop owned by Koreans, who were excellent to work with, and could manage his sometimes maddening deadlines.

Carlos was spared the emotional distress of having to speak with Juan again. The insurance company that wrote his Kidnap and Ransom insurance took over the successful negotiations with the cartel so that his daughter could be freed. He still could not fathom how his best friend of twenty years ago could now be working for one of the most vicious and notorious drug cartels in Mexico.

Although not currently a churchgoer, he was raised a Roman Catholic. He reflected on the forbidden fruit of the Garden of Eden. Just one week ago, they had lived in a similar paradise. But like Adam and Eve, they could now not return to this peaceful and predictable world.

The moist, soft, delicious avocado fruit was his last link to Juan. After all, the fruit that Eve ate was called the fruit of good and evil. How strange it turned out to be good for Carlos and evil for Juan.

His jet gently sloped down to the runway. He promised himself to protect the privacy of his affairs ever more vigilantly. Yes, the former bubble had burst, but he could construct a more solid one going forward. All he could be sure of was that Juan had taken his path in life, and he had taken another. Carlos’s new path would have to include a new, creative design, presently unknown, but one he vowed to find. After all, that is how he had amassed his billions.

Conclusion

As we are learning, the danger of data collection by online companies is not that they will use it to try to sell you stuff. The danger is that that information can so easily fall into the hands of parties whose motives are much less benign. A government, for example.

EWP and PPLI are employed by our firm to not only give you enhanced privacy, we also keep you compliant with tax authorities worldwide. This is something that other asset structures can’t accomplish. The Privacy Principle is integral to our successful asset structures.

EWP has the six principles that matter most to wealthy families throughout the world today—no matter where they are located. They are the building blocks of any successful asset structure.

If an EWP Structure Had Been Used….

Can an EWP Structure prevent kidnapping and extortion? While an EWP Structure can’t prevent the nefarious deeds of organized crime, it can go a long way in securing the privacy that can prevent these acts of physical and emotional violence. Had Carlos Gutierrez had a properly executed EWP Structure, it is doubtful that his story would have unfolded in such a painful way. Since an insurance company becomes the beneficial owner of the assets in an EWP Structure, the reporting requirements to government agencies are very limited.

If the drug cartel wished to secure details about the private financial matters of the Gutierrez family, they would be hard pressed to find them. As it was, the details that they needed to kidnap Lucinda and begin their frivolous lawsuit were readily available to them using the Gutierrez’s present asset structure. The precise, pin-point accuracy of the planning that led to the kidnapping of Lucinda would not have been possible with an EWP Structure in place. The information that the cartel used would simply have not been available to them.

Please Contact Us for any questions you may have.

 

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.

CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Tax Planning and Financial Architecture

Financial Architecture
The Comprehensive Blueprint

 

Would you build a custom home without an architect?

Have you constructed your financial affairs without one?

How would you know?

You have constructed your financial home over time, using the best options available when opportunities presented themselves. This may inadvertently have created a house constructed by multiple architects, many different styles that may or may not fit together.

Why not take the designs that we have used with great success for the world’s wealthiest families to remodel your own house?

As financial architects, we can offer you an overreaching, comprehensive, and cohesive design optimized for privacy, tax efficiency, and asset protection.

We are not here to replace your trusted business or investment advisors. Our role is to take what you have already accomplished and place it into a structure that will create a unified design for all your interests, a method we have used for the world’s wealthiest families, families with a wide variety of assets and financial arrangements.

Read Full Article in our partner site

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.

CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

International Tax Planning At Its Best- 2

Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) At Its Best

White Paper-Part 2

 The authority of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) has been firmly established. Wikipedia has recognized our knowledge-based solutions for wealthy families by including the concept of EWP in their article on International Tax Planning. On this Wikipedia page, the six principles of EWP are explained. EWP is defined as “an element of international taxation created to implement directives from several tax authorities following the 2008 worldwide recession.”

The six principles of EWP are: privacy, asset protection, tax shield, succession planning, compliance simplifier, and trust substitute.

The Wikipedia article goes on to say, “EWP allows a tax paying entity to simplify its existing structures and minimize reporting obligations under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) and the Common Reporting Standard (CRS). These international assets can also comply with tax authorities worldwide.”

We are taking a cue from Wikipedia. Our white paper features the six principles of EWP. EWP has the six principles that matter most to wealthy families throughout the world today—no matter where they are located. They are the building blocks of any successful asset structure.

Compliance Simplifier

For most people a spider’s web is not a positive image. For this reason EWP uses a spider’s web as a symbol of an overly complicated asset structure with multiple entities and a confusing array of boxes and arrows. In its complexity, what we call a Spider Web Structure might look impressive to some, but the end result is summarized in three words: overcomplication, confusion, and uncertainty.

Our excellent alternative is an EWP Structure, which was born out of the necessity to achieve greater tax efficiency, privacy, and asset protection. The laws and regulations that govern an EWP Structure are made possible through a more stable and straightforward body of law than the more politicized tax laws and regulations worldwide.

FATCA and CRS

The beginning of the end for Spider Web Structures began in 2010 with the birth of the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA). The impetus was to stem the tide of U.S. persons using overseas accounts and assets for the purposes of tax evasion. The structure of FATCA is twofold. First, individual taxpayers must report their qualifying foreign income to the Internal Revenue Service (IRS). At the same time, the Foreign Financial Institutions (FFIs) that hold or process that income must report the identity of their qualifying U.S. clients to the United States.

Nine years later, the Organization for Economic Co-Operation and Development (OECD), at the behest of the G20 and the G8, proposed similar regulations under the name CRS, or Common Standard on Reporting and Due Diligence for Financial Account Information. In fact, some commentators, noting the similarities between the two initiatives, have dubbed CRS GATCA, or Global FATCA.

EWP Structures Enter the Picture

Another strong impetus that favors EWP Structures are unexpected disclosures by the press that aim to discredit worldwide financial centers, and the asset structures that are formed in them. The unauthorized publishing of documents in the Panama Papers and Paradise Papers caused financial documents to be made public that were thought to be private.

Some good came out of these disclosures in that those who sought to illegally hide assets from tax authorities were exposed, but at the cost of discomforting many innocent families who had their financial affairs paraded across the popular press.

These families sought to do no more than Judge Learned Hand adjudicated in 1934:

“Any one may so arrange his affairs that his taxes shall be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which will best pay the Treasury; there is not even a patriotic duty to increase one’s taxes.” Gregory v. Helvering, 69 F.2d 809, 810 (2d Cir. 1934)

EWP Structures for the most part, escape these periodic, unwarranted intrusions into the privacy of ordinary citizens, since they use a more universally accepted aspect of financial planning.

Complexities of Trust Reporting

When overseas holdings involve foreign trusts, things become significantly more complex. As a trustee, grantor, or beneficiary of a foreign trust, you do not want to make a mistake that could cause significant unplanned negative tax ramifications. The way in which you must report foreign trusts to the IRS varies, depending on the type of trust that’s involved.

For an EWP Structure that is owned by a foreign trust there would be reporting for the owner of the trust, but at the policy level only FinCen Form 114 and Form 8938 are currently required, and, only the total value of the assets in the PPLI policy are reported, not the individual assets themselves.

Why engage in complex trust and entity planning that just produces overcomplication, confusion, and uncertainty—yes, Spider Web Structures? You can definitely accomplish much more with a simple and straightforward EWP Structure.

Trust Substitute

The more sophisticated tools gravitate toward the most sophisticated users of these tools. A Stradivarius violin is used by a master violinist and not a beginner. When clients and advisors initially approach us about EWP Structures, they are confused about their uses.

For the most part, what these clients and advisors have read about are the beginning uses of EWP Structures. They have not explored the upper reaches and more sophisticated uses of EWP Structures that employ these structures to their full effect. To keep to our analogy, they have picked up a beginner’s violin, and know nothing of the deep, rich, and more pleasing tone of the Stradivarius violin.

The sixth principle of EWP is Trust Substitute. An EWP Structure can sometimes be used as a substitute for a trust in some civil law jurisdictions. An EWP Structure is also a substitute for existing trust structures that families might be using, and can propel these existing structures beyond the beginner stage of financial planning. This is what we employ for the world’s wealthiest families.

Advisors Don’t Know What They Don’t Know

The confusion about the uses of EWP Structures that we mentioned in our opening paragraph is exacerbated by the system that educates attorneys, accountants, trust officers, and asset managers. There is virtually no mention of EWP Structures in colleges, universities, law schools, and the other training grounds of these professionals.

For instance, attorneys spend time learning the various uses of trusts, so they produce these for their clients, even when they are not always the best tool for the job at hand. They don’t know what they don’t know.

Trusts serve an essential purpose in planning for the world’s wealthiest families, but over reliance on them is a grave mistake. If done correctly, the marriage of a trust with an EWP Structure can indeed be a happy one.

A Safe Drive to the Ultimate Destination

We will use a multi-lane motorway or freeway as our analogy to show how EWP Structures are ideally positioned to serve the needs of wealthy families worldwide. Where are EWP Structures positioned on this motorway?

The fast lane is for those drivers who are the risk takers, traveling at ever faster speeds until they hear the sound of a patrol car chasing them down. In the slow lane are those drivers who wish to drive the speed limit, or wish to travel at a leisurely pace to reach their destination. In the middle lanes are those drivers who wish to blend into the flow. Not be the fastest on the road, or the slowest. In the universe of financial planning tools, EWP Structures are traveling in these middle lanes.

These middle lane drivers are avoiding the newest innovations in planning techniques championed by those in the fast lane, and, also, staying away from strategies that accomplish little which are adopted by those in the slow lane. The drivers in the middle lanes will reach their destination safely with little risk of a confrontation with the authorities, who are concentrating on the drivers in the fast lane.

By using EWP Structures, the families driving in the middle lanes accomplish the maximum amount of privacy, asset protection, and tax efficiency, and are fully compliant with tax authorities worldwide.

Is It Legal?

It seems every few months that there is another revelation of a tax dodger using offshore accounts to avoid U.S. taxes. Here is a recent newspaper headline: “The IRS Reals in a Whale of an Offshore Tax Cheat—and Goes for Another.”

Is an EWP Structure just another one of these schemes? Our EWP Structures have existed since the early 1990s with no issues of any kind either from the IRS or the families who have employed these asset structures.

We have no less an authority than the U.S. Government Accountability office (GAO) to validate EWP Structures. The GAO provides fact-based, nonpartisan information to Congress. Jessica Lucas-Judy, a GAO director, writes:

“Obtaining insurance from offshore companies can provide legitimate federal tax benefits, as long as the insurance is genuine and taxpayers accurately report assets, claim appropriate benefits, and pay taxes owed.”

All out EWP Structures are thoroughly researched to compile with all laws and regulations that might apply to them. We undertake this both for our U.S. families and those from other countries throughout the world. A July 2020, GAO report reads:

“Offshore variable life insurance products, which are insurance policies with investment components over which the insured has certain control, may be abused if the individual taxpayer fails to meet IRS reporting requirements or pay appropriate federal income taxes. Federal regulations require that taxpayers with certain foreign life insurance accounts report this information to the IRS and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network. The structure of life insurance products may vary and taxpayers are required to pay taxes based on the underlying type of financial product the policy represents.”

We comply with all requirements for the reporting of foreign accounts. This extends to all tax authorities worldwide and the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network in the U.S. Families are informed of all their tax paying obligations both in the U.S., and any tax authority worldwide that may be involved in the transaction. This is all thoroughly researched before the EWP Structure is put in place.

Can They Steal My Money?

The answer is, “No.” Why is this so? Because all your assets are held in separate accounts by a trustee. This is a similar arrangement to having a trust account at a bank. The bank becomes the trustee of the asset, but ownership does not change hands—you retain ownership of all the assets held in an EWP Structure.

Here is an example of how a separate account is defined by one of the key jurisdictions that we use to establish an EWP Structure.

“The assets of the company are segregated into separate accounts that are kept separate from the general assets of the company. The “assets of a separate account” include firstly, the specific assets owned by a company allocated and credited to the separate account. It also includes all income, interest, gains, expenses and losses incurred or earned, in respect of the company’s dealing with the assets that are allocated to the separate account in accordance with the terms of the contract that relate to the establishment of the separate account.”

Conclusion

Our firm, EWP Financial, serves wealthy families wherever they might reside. We offer the most advanced financial planning tools available to assist them in making the six principles of EWP the building blocks of their asset structures.

As our outstanding track record has proven, the asset structures that we build have remained solid for multiple generations, bringing wealthy families financial security and peace of mind.

Download full White Paper

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

International Tax Planning At Its Best-1

Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) At Its Best

White Paper-Part 1

The authority of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) has been firmly established. Wikipedia has recognized our knowledge-based solutions for wealthy families by including the concept of EWP in their article on International Tax Planning. On this Wikipedia page, the six principles of EWP are explained.

EWP is defined as:

“An element of international taxation created to implement directives from several tax authorities following the 2008 worldwide recession.”

The six principles of EWP are: privacy, asset protection, tax shield, succession planning, compliance simplifier, and trust substitute.

The Wikipedia article goes on to say,

“EWP allows a tax paying entity to simplify its existing structures and minimize reporting obligations under the Foreign Account Tax Compliance Act (FATCA) and the Common Reporting Standard (CRS). These international assets can also comply with tax authorities worldwide.”

We are taking a cue from Wikipedia. Our white paper features the six principles of EWP. EWP has the six principles that matter most to wealthy families throughout the world today—no matter where they are located. They are the building blocks of any successful asset structure.

Read full article in our partner site.

 

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

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International Tax Planning & Trust Substitute

International Tax Planning and Trust Substitute

Part 1

EWP (Expanded Worldwide Planning) and Trust Substitute

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in Action

The Dangers of Over Reliance on Trusts

The more sophisticated tools gravitate toward the most sophisticated users of these tools. A Stradivarius violin is used by a master violinist and not a beginner. When clients and advisors initially approach us about Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI), they are confused about its uses.

For the most part, what these clients and advisors have read about are beginning uses of PPLI. They have not explored the upper reaches and more sophisticated uses of asset structures that employ PPLI to its full effect. To keep to our analogy, they have picked up a beginner’s violin, and know nothing of the deep, rich, and more pleasing tone of the Stradivarius violin.

We will now discuss the sixth principle of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP), Trust Substitute. We will of course speak of the obvious use of a PPLI asset structure in place of a trust structure in some civil law jurisdictions, but we will also expand our discussion to explore the very nature of trust and how they differ from the sophisticated structures that we use for the world’s wealthiest families. Our discussion will also touch on why a PPLI structure is a far better tool for the client who seeks both maximum privacy, asset protection, and tax efficiency, as well as full compliance with the world’s tax authorities.

Advisors Don’t Know What They Don’t Know………..

 

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

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International Tax Planning & Compliance Simplifier-Part 2

EWP (Expanded Worldwide Planning) and Compliance Simplifier

Part 2

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in Action

Inside a Deadly Spider Web Structure

Depending on the planning needs of international families, two types of trusts are generally used, Foreign Grantor Trust and Foreign Non-Grantor Trust. These trusts can accomplish some of the aims of the six principles of EWP, but they can do nothing in terms of tax efficiency. For this a trust must own a properly structured PPLI policy. An EWP structure uses the six principles of EWP to give families the optimum amount of tax efficiency, privacy, and asset protection.

Foreign Grantor Trusts and Foreign Non-Grantor Trusts

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

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International Tax Planning & Compliance Simplifier

Part 1

EWP (Expanded Worldwide Planning) and Compliance Simplifier

PPLI Keeps You Out of a Spider Web Structure

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For most people a spider’s web is not a positive image. For this reason Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) uses a spider’s web as a symbol of an overly complicated asset structure with multiple entities and a confusing array of boxes and arrows. In its complexity, what we call a Spider Web Structure might look impressive to some, but the end result is summarized in three words: overcomplication, confusion, and uncertainty. Later on we will give you a detailed description of a Spider Web Structure.

We propose an alternative asset structure that we call an EWP Structure.

At the heart of an EWP Structure is a Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) policy which was born out of the necessity to achieve greater tax efficiency, privacy, and asset protection in one low cost structure with institutional pricing. A PPLI structure is made possible through the laws and regulations of life insurance. A much more stable and straightforward body of law than the more politicized tax laws and regulations worldwide.

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

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International Tax Planning & Succession Planning-Part 2

EWP, (Expanded Worldwide Planning) and Succession Planning

Part 2

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in Action

PPLI: The Best Tool for the Job—Part 2

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A PPLI policy is not a uniquely civil-or common-law creation. Its treatment in law is more uniform than planning solely with entities like trust, foundations, and LLCs. The unique design of a PPLI policy can greatly assist in a move between civil-and common-law jurisdictions.

This can be done without the requirement of a will or trust. Upon death of the insured person(s), the value of the PPLI policy plus any death benefit is paid directly to the beneficiaries listed in the policy, and separate from probate.

If a PPLI policy is held by an entity, such as a trust, that is compliant in the beneficiary’s country of residence, tax deferral and investment flexibility can still be preserved, even if the trust is disregarded as a foreign entity.

Gift and estate planning for life policies frequently involves establishment of a specially structured insurance trust for the benefit of a spouse and/or children and descendants. The trust acquires the policy with the premiums being contributed to the trust by the settlor/insured. In this manner, the death benefit would be paid to the trust free of estate taxes rather than going outright to the surviving family members after the payment of estate taxes.

PPLI policies also could invest in PFICs without creating adverse tax consequences. From a US perspective, US persons should generally be aware that most non-US collective investment vehicles will be classified as PFICs for US purposes and subject to adverse tax charges upon generating income and gains.

Unwelcomed Complexities by Country

The laws of succession and inheritance vary widely by country. By reviewing the laws of France, China, Russia, and Saudi Arabia, we give you a sampling of the complications faced by wealthy international families throughout the world. Image a family that might have family members and assets in several of these countries, and the daunting task of settling their estate.

France

Before the Napoleonic Code, France did not have a single set of laws; law consisted mainly of local customs, which had sometimes been officially compiled in “custumals” (coutumes), notably the Custom of Paris. There were also exemptions, privileges, and special charters granted by the kings or other feudal lords. During the Revolution, the last vestiges of feudalism were abolished.

France’s Napoleonic code dictates how your assets must be distributed on your death. The key points are:

  • For French residents, succession law applies to worldwide assets (excluding real estate outside France).
  • For non-residents, French real estate is subject to the succession law rules.
  • Assets do not automatically pass in accordance with your will.
  • Children are protected heirs, inheriting up to 75% of your estate.
  • Spouses are not automatically protected.
  • You can use the EU succession regulations, termed Brussels IV, to opt for the succession law of your nationality instead of French law.

Brussels IV has been in place since August 17, 2015. Its intention was to simplify issues relating to succession across the EU. The objective of Brussels IV is to ensure that only one country’s laws apply to the deceased’s estate. The laws of the country in which a person is habitually resident at their death will apply to them unless they have made a declaration during their lifetime.

Brussels IV gives residents in EU countries (with the exception of the UK, Denmark and Ireland) a single set of rules which govern the jurisdiction and applicable law in succession law matters. The new rules look primarily to the deceased’s place of habitual residence, but an individual may elect that his succession should be governed by the law of his nationality (whether or not he is a national of an EU member state). The new rules also introduced a European Certificate of Succession, aimed at facilitating the administration of cross-border estates.

China

Unlike common law countries, China possesses few legal instruments for processing a solid estate plan. But because China does not levy estate or inheritance tax, nor does it collect a gift tax, there is less demand for estate planning, which tends to focus on tax savings. However, family business succession is looming large in China, with many first generation entrepreneurs approaching retirement.

Under Chinese inheritance law, when a valid will is made, it is generally respected. So these estates pass to the beneficiaries designated in the will. When a person dies without having a valid will in place, the estate passes to heirs under the statutory succession rules.

China has a limited forced heirship regime under which dependents of the deceased are entitled to succession to the extent that they otherwise cannot support themselves, for example, those who are unable to work and have no source of income. As such, a family trust may be liable to forced heirship claims against trust assets.

Under the Chinese statutory succession rules, the first half of the estate is distributed to the spouse of the deceased as community property. The rest is distributed to the spouse, the parents and the children of the deceased in equal shares. The limited forced heirship regime cannot be avoided. All the assets, including those received by beneficiaries in other jurisdictions, are taken into account for the forced heirship regime.

For statutory succession purposes, the succession rules of the habitual residence of the deceased at the time of their death will apply, unless the asset is a real estate located in China where the Chinese succession rules will automatically apply. This can be avoided by making a will by the foreign national.

In the absence of a will, Chinese statuary succession rules apply to the deceased’s real estate in China even if the deceased is a foreign national. Chinese laws do not recognize the doctrine of renvoi. By invoking renvoi, the court could rule that the law of another country would be the most appropriate law to apply in this case.

There are no other taxes on death or lifetime gifts unless the gifts would be deemed as a transfer of assets, for example, gifts of shares or real estate between non-family members, in which case the individual income tax on deemed gains will be imposed on the transferor.

Russia

Russian inheritance laws cover everyone who is domiciled (i.e., has his or her usual place of living, but not necessarily his or her nationality) in the Russian Federation, and also covers everyone including foreigners who own property in the Russian Federation.

Minor and disabled children of any deceased person domiciled in Russia, disabled spouse and parents, and any disabled dependants of the deceased must inherit at least one-half of the share each of them is entitled to inherit by law, irrespective of any testamentary provisions.

There are two types of inheritance: testamentary inheritance (when there is a will of a deceased) and intestate inheritance (in the absence of a will of a deceased and in other statutory cases). The deceased’s estate incorporates the items and other property the deceased owned as of the date of the opening of the inheritance, including property rights and liabilities. Rights and liabilities inseparable from the personality of the deceased (e.g., rights to alimony), personal incorporeal rights and other intangible assets are not included in the estate.

If no provisions are made in prospect of death, a complex statutory order of intestate inheritance is applied to all persons covered by Russian inheritance law. The heirs-in-law (individuals only) include children of the deceased, his or her spouse and parents, brothers and sisters, other relatives and disabled dependants of the deceased.

The tax on the assets transferred through inheritance or donation that previously existed, was abolished effective January 2006. Alongside the abolishment of inheritance and gift tax, personal income tax applies in certain instances where individuals receive gifts.

In certain cases, individuals receiving income through inheritance may also be subject to personal income tax as a regular taxable income. There is no inheritance tax in Russia. There is no gift tax in Russia, although in certain cases personal income tax may be levied. There is no real estate transfer tax in Russia, although in certain cases personal income tax may be levied. There is no net wealth tax in Russia.

Russian tax residents are taxable in Russia on their worldwide income, generally, at a 13% tax rate (including, but not limited to, gifts in various forms and inheritance in special cases). For some types of income, such as dividends and material benefit, different tax rates are applied. Russian tax nonresidents are taxable only on their Russian source of income at a 30% tax rate on most types of taxable income (including, but not limited to, income earned in Russia).

There are currently no estate tax treaties between the Russian Federation and other countries.

Saudi Arabia

To understand the basis for Islamic inheritance law, you will need to be familiar with inheritance laws in Arabia pre-Islam. The sole inheritance was given to the asaba (male relatives) of the deceased. The surviving male relatives inherited in order of family position; the son superseded the father, the father superseded the uncles and so on.

Islam has kept the position of the male inheritance principals, but with slight modifications to give women more security. Pre-Islam men inherited, but were not required to care for the females in their families with the inheritance; Islam encourages the opposite. In Islamic Inheritance, the male inherits twice that of the female, but is encouraged to care for the single women in his family from it.

Inheritance between non-Muslims is governed by the will, which has to be registered with the Shariah Court, or witnessed by two adult Muslims. Non-Muslims cannot normally inherit from Muslims and vice versa, but if there is a will which applies to less than 30% of the estate, that portion of the estate can be transmitted across religious lines. There are no inheritance taxes in Saudi Arabia.

Saudi Arabia is governed by Shariah Law, which is a religious law that is based on the Quran and the teachings and practices of the Prophet Mohammed (the Sunna). It was borne out of the Islamic tradition governing all aspects of life. It regulates all of human activity, national and international, public and private, criminal and civil and is applied by courts.

Ultimately, Shariah Law has its own standards in resolving and enforcing sanctions on various cases. As such, in cases of estate settlement, inheritance and wills, certain rules apply. These cases take into consideration the allocation and distribution of shares/properties specified by the defendant or deceased to his family, company and others, following the rules of Shariah Law.

With regard to the law of inheritance, the Quran specifies that fixed portions of the deceased’s estate must be left to the so-called “Quranic heirs”. Generally, female heirs receive half the portion of male heirs. A Sunni Muslim can bequeath a maximum of a third of his property to non-Quranic heirs. The residue is divided between agnatic heirs.

Conclusion

Wealthy families frequently hold second passports, and have homes in foreign countries. Over time, family events like death, separation, and remarriage complicate estate plans. All of these factors can dissipate family assets.

Life insurance is recognized in almost every country worldwide as a safe, straightforward, and simple wealth transfer vehicle. The use of PPLI only adds to the benefits, since in a properly structured PPLI policy almost any asset can be held.

A PPLI policy passes assets directly to intended beneficiaries and keeps family wealth intact, giving families the maximum amount of privacy, asset protection, and tax efficiency. Contact us today to find out how your family can benefit from this unique blend of life insurance and asset structuring.

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

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International Tax Planning & Succession Planning

Expanded Worldwide Planning, (EWP) & Succession Planning-Part 1

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in Action

PPLI Benefits International Family Wealth Transfer–Part 1

Background

Many countries, primarily in civil-law jurisdictions, require forced distribution of assets at death according to strict laws and regulations. This usually takes the form of percentage shares of assets that will be distributed to spouses, children, and other close relations of the deceased. A PPLI policy purchased outside the home country of the owner or policyholder is a method to mitigate these forced heirship rules.

The PPLI policy is a contract between the owner of the policy and the insurance company to pay the beneficiary of the policy the death benefit upon the death of the insured under the contract. A typical beneficiary provision of a life insurance policy states:

“Unless an alternate payment plan, acceptable to us, is chosen, the proceeds payable at the insured’s death will be paid in a lump sum to the primary Beneficiary. If the primary Beneficiary dies before the insured, the proceeds will be paid to the contingent Beneficiary. If no Beneficiary survives the insured, the proceeds will be paid to your estate.”

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

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International Tax Planning & Tax Shield-2

PPLI with IDF vs. Other Real Estate Structures

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International Tax Planning, (EWP), and Tax Shield-2

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in Action

The Hampton Freeze & Beyond–Part 2

The universality of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) is not to be denied. This is objectified by Wikipedia. In the first sentence of their page on International Tax Planning, Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) is featured.

We are taking a cue from Wikipedia. Over the next few weeks, we will feature one of the six principles of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP). The six principles are: privacy, asset protection, tax shield, succession planning, compliance simplifier, and trust substitute. Today we feature the tax shield.

PPLI Benefits Non-U.S. Persons with Real Estate

There are many obstacles that non-U.S. persons face in investing in U.S. real estate. The primary tax impediments to foreign investment in U.S. real estate in general and in real estate funds specifically are U.S. income, capital gains and withholding taxes. Adding Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) in combination with trusts and LLC elements eliminates or mitigates U.S., withholding taxes, U.S. income and capital gains taxes, and estate taxes.

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by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

#michaelmalloy #PPLI #EWP #privateplacement #lifeinsurance #advancedfinancialsolutions