How PPLI Negotiates for You

World Leaders Teach EWP

Negotiating is at the heart of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP), and Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI).  What can we learn from the much publicized negotiation between Donald Trump and Kim Jong Un? One thing is obvious about this meeting.  We don’t really know much. The most substantive talks were held in private between the two leaders. As the saying goes, “After all is said and done, more is said than done.”

So what we read in the press about this negotiation is mostly speculation and conjecture, and another part is supplied by our own attitudes towards these world leaders and their countries. This is precisely what is avoided in EWP.  By using a properly structured PPLI policy, we are able to build a plan on a strong foundation of knowledge.

A good part of this solid foundation is insurance regulations. These regulations tend to be simpler and more straightforward than the tax codes of the world’s countries, and supply many key benefits that are not allowed under tax codes.

One definition of negotiating from the Wiktionary is “To succeed in coping with, or getting over something.” This is why we can say PPLI NEGOTIATES FOR YOU. It allows you to succeed using the key elements of EWP: privacy, asset protection, succession planning, tax shield, compliance simplifier, and trust substitute.

How this ability to succeed in planning for wealth international families plays out in detail depends on the particulars involved: where the family reside; the tax codes of the countries where the various family members reside; the nationalities of these family members; the assets involved; and most importantly, the tax and estate planning aims of the family.  All these elements are part of a successful EWP engagement, and what our firm enjoys most–giving families the most cost efficient and comprehensive plan possible.

History of PPLI

In the various press stories on the Trump and Kim Jong Un negotiation are historical perspectives going back to Kim’s father and grandfather. This made us realize that we have never given you a history of PPLI. Here is a short one courtesy of Trusts & Estates by Grant R. Markuson.

“PPLI really began as a way of customizing specific types of insurance products as part of corporate benefit planning for senior executives. Although the rank and file employees may have been happy with the benefits of more typical insurance offerings, senior executives often desired greater investment options, lower fees, and greater overall customization. This, in conjunction with the growing use of variable contracts, led to the birth of individualized PPLI products. The Internal Revenue Service (Service) initially ruled on these types of customized variable products in a series of Revenue Rulings from 1977-1982.

 

In the early 1990s, PPLI products for wealthy individuals surfaced again out of the Channel Islands. Soon after that, Cayman Island and Bermuda based products started to surface. As the hedge fund industry started to pick up steam during this period, many of the products were being specifically developed for these investments. In the mid 1990s, many of the major U.S. and European carriers entered the international PPLI market, which brought this type of planning back into the mainstream.”

To bring our brief history up to the present, we find a robust appetite for PPLI and EWP at present with the fast paced growth of wealthy international families throughout the world. Using PPLI and EWP at the service of these families can achieve bespoke solutions not possible with other methods of international tax planning.

We welcome the opportunity to negotiate on your behalf and reach a successful result for all concerned. Thank you for your continued trust and support. Please give us your thoughts.

 

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 by Michael Malloy CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

 

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Privacy Flows with EWP and PPLI

GO WITH THE FLOW

“Go with the flow” can have several meanings, and oddly enough, in the context of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) it can pertain to privacy.  As our firm specializes in structuring for international clients using Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI), we will discuss two recent news articles and how they relate to securing privacy, as well as full compliance, for families involved in international tax planning. The articles are interesting in themselves, and we have used them to make a few points related to our topic.

Because PPLI is issued under a variable universal life insurance contract, the insurance company becomes the beneficial owner of the assets inside the policy.  When reporting to the tax authorities of the jurisdictions involved with the policy, the insurance company becomes the owner of the assets inside the policy, even though the assets are held in separate accounts for the benefit of the owner of the assets.  It is the goal of EWP to secure as much privacy for clients that is allowable under law, and still be fully compliant with tax authorities worldwide.

Now back to our new articles and “going with the flow.” In a certain sense, the flow of information and the flow of wealth is akin to plumbing.  As long as things flow, in the direction intended there is not a problem.  When things begin to backup or flow in the wrong direction, we encounter problems.

Our first news article discusses the movement of families within the U.S. to states with no or little state income tax, and how the states that have high state income taxes like New York and California are unprepared for the loss of these tax dollars. The point is also made in the article that the states like Florida and Texas that are receiving the migrating families are also unprepared for the influx of new people in their states. In our analogy, we have a situation here where things are flowing in a direction that is not intended.

Here are a few of the salient points courtesy  of the Wall Street Journal by Arthur B. Laffer and Stephen Moore, “So Long, California. Sayonara, New York.” 

“Since 2007 Texas and Florida (with no income tax) have gained 1.4 million and 850,000 residents, respectively, from other states. California and New York have jointly lost more than 2.2 million.”

 

“As the migration speeds up, it will raise real-estate values in low-tax states and hurt them in high-tax states.”

 

“Despite its shrinking tax base, New York spends nearly twice as much on state and local government per person ($16,000) as does economically booming Tennessee ($9,000).”

Our second news article is about the flow of information, and a possible unintended consequence of regulating it. Perhaps the pipes have been put at the wrong angles, or in the wrong place?

Again, from the Wall Street Journal by Steve Rosenbush, “The Morning Download: Europe’s New Privacy Rule, in Unexpected Twist, Helps Facebook, Google.”

The main point of the article is contained in these two quotes:

“The EU will begin enforcing the General Data Protection Regulation, “which in many cases require companies to obtain affirmative consent to use European residents’ personal information,” the Journal’s Sam Schechner and Nick Kostov report

 

“Google and Facebook, using their scale and sophistication, “are applying a relatively strict interpretation of the new law, competitors say—setting an industry standard that is hard for smaller firms to meet,” the Journal reports.”

How does our discussion of “go with the flow” pertain to the benefits of using EWP and a properly constructed PPLI policy to provide privacy?  In the first article, the families were moving to save significant tax dollars.  Inside the privacy protection of PPLI, there is a similar movement, as the assets inside the policy, if structured correctly, are in a tax-free environment.  Like the families in question, they have gone from a high tax situation to a no tax situation–if they moved to Florida and Texas where there is no state income tax.

The new privacy regulations in the second article that favor companies like Google and Facebook show how laws change over time, and when the laws change, it affects the companies subject to the regulation.  One favorable element of using PPLI for structuring is that it is subject to the insurance regulations of the tax authorities involved in the policy structure.  Insurance regulation tends to be much more simple and straightforward than tax codes, and this greatly favors families in their planning.

The insurance codes in most countries are also less subject to change than the tax codes. Insurance is also considered a vehicle that benefits the whole society. EWP structures enjoy the simplicity that insurance affords.

Our firm is here to assist you in “going with the flow” in the right direction, so please let us know your needs, and so we can find out if your situation is right for EWP and PPLI.

 

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 by Michael Malloy CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

 

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Tax Compliance & Privacy Together: PPLI

Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) in Action

A government needs tax dollars to achieve its aims.  Many countries give their citizens, at least in their official pronouncements, a right to keep their financial affairs private.  We have conflict here.  How is this conflict resolved?

In most governmental systems throughout the world, the judicial system has the role of mediator between a government and its citizens. We will discuss two current topics in this area below.  But first, since our role is to assist private clients in navigating the difficult waters between tax compliance and privacy, a word on how we accomplish this.

We are advocates of Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP).  EWP works to resolve the conflict outlined above. This is achieved by using a properly structured Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) policy.

Any asset that can be held in custody by a reputable trust company can go into the PPLI structure. Many policies are owned by trusts which can be domiciled in jurisdictions in keeping with the client’s planning needs. In terms of asset management, it is an open architecture model where the assets can be located in multiple jurisdictions with multiple asset managers.

PPLI insurance costs generally average about 1 percent of the cash value of the policy. The cost of the death benefit varies with the health and age of the insured person, and generally policies are designed with the lowest death benefit possible. Tax and enhanced privacy benefits outweigh the costs of using a PPLI structure. Asset management fees will depend on the asset manager(s) selected to manage the assets inside the policy.

Notable Current Issues on This Topic

These two important items are brought to us courtesy of the Society of Trust and Estate Practitioners (STEP).

  • Powers to issue ‘unexplained wealth orders’ against people who cannot account for their assets, as set out in the UK Criminal Finances Act 2017, will come into effect this Wednesday (31 January), the UK government has announced. A new procedure allowing the authorities to issue bank account freezing and forfeiture notices without a court order comes into force at the same time. An extended legal definition of ‘cash’, to include many kinds of physical property, will come into force on 16 April, along with a new procedure to seize, detain and forfeit it.
  • The trusts, tax structures and other banking arrangements disclosed by documents stolen from offshore law firm Appleby Global are unlikely to be examined in detail in the course of the firm’s breach of confidence litigation against the BBC and the Guardian, according to an interim judgment of the England and Wales High Court. The primary issue will be whether the defendants’ journalism was sufficiently in the public interest to outweigh the breach of confidence entailed by the hacking of Appleby’s computer system, and the subsequent leaking of its client documents to the media (Appleby v BBC and The Guardian, 2018 EWHC 104 Ch).

The first news item is striking in that the UK government has eliminated the obtaining of a court order in allowing authorities to issue bank account freezing and forfeiture orders.  We mention the second item, Appleby v BBC and The Guardian, because the issue the Court is deciding goes to the heart of all the recent leaks of private client information by news organizations and non-profits.

EWP and a properly structured PPLI policy cannot solve all your problems, but we hope we can assist in solving a few of them.  We welcome your inquiries, comments, and suggestions.

 

 by Michael Malloy CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

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Privacy and the Paradise Papers

The “New Switzerland” Revisited

The right to privacy is enshrined in the formal pronouncements of government bodies throughout the world. The Paradise Papers, and previously the Panama Papers, demonstrate that in practice, this right to privacy receives very different interpretations. These two data hacks reveal the conflict between tax authorities’ right to tax and citizens’ fundamental right to privacy.

How one thinks about this conflict is of course dictated by how it is discussed. Most people receive their information from the various media outlets. Depending on whom you listen to, you will receive very different interpretations of the documents that have been put forward to the public.

As quoted in the New York Times this week, Ross Delston, a Washington D.C.-based anti-money-laundering expert, said, “What we learned confirms what we always suspected: That the use of offshore companies is more widespread than ever imagined. Offshore financial centers are useful not just for crooks, oligarchs and politically exposed persons but also to the largest global companies and highest net-worth individuals.”

Mateo Jarrin Cuvi in his October 27, 2017 post on Taxlinked, “Data Protection Takes Hit with Bermuda Hack,” quotes the Cayman Compass in reference to the Panama Papers, “In recent years we have witnessed the emergence of a different sort of “investigative journalism” that largely includes the public dumping of private information, oftentimes in the absence of analysis, context or verification. It is journalism most foul.”
Two opposing views indeed!

Privacy Moves to the United States?

Another practical demonstration of the conflict between government taxation and citizens’ fundamental right to privacy is what some have termed the “New Switzerland.” This is the movement of funds previously placed in locations like Switzerland and offshore jurisdictions to the United States.

To continue our theme of contrasting viewpoints, below are quotes on tax avoidance. The first is by the Tax Justice Network, and the second by Learned Hand, a U.S. Federal Judge from a 1934 case, Helvering v. Gregory. The attitude expressed by Learned Hand is prevalent in the U.S., while the OECD champions the attitude in the Tax Justice Network quote that is in reference to the Paradise Papers.

“Just because no one is put in jail, doesn’t mean no one has committed a crime. All that said, just because a prosecuting authority doesn’t bring charges, it doesn’t mean that no crime has taken place.”

“Anyone may arrange his affairs so that his taxes shall be as low as possible; he is not bound to choose that pattern which best pays the treasury. There is not even a patriotic duty to increase one’s taxes. Over and over again the Courts have said that there is nothing sinister in so arranging affairs as to keep taxes as low as possible. Everyone does it, rich and poor alike and all do right, for nobody owes any public duty to pay more than the law demands.”

No wonder the “New Switzerland” has come to pass!
One irony in this movement of funds to the U.S. is that the U.S. in effect began the movement of tax transparency with FATCA in 2008, which was closely followed-up with the OECD’s Common Reporting Standard (CRS). Some have brought their funds to the U.S. in structures that can be easily pierced by CRS.

There are structures that give privacy and significant tax benefits to international clients without moving family assets to the US merely to avoid CRS reporting. These structures also achieve tax compliance with tax authorities. Our firm specializes in these structures, and would be glad to discuss them with you in more detail.

We welcome your inquiries. Please Contact Us or write them at the bottom of the page.

Thank you!

Michael Malloy CLU TEP RFC, @ Advanced Financial Solutions, Inc

Michael Malloy Contact Info