Fortifying Your Financial Future

How to Secure Your Wealth Globally

and the Protection of Crypto

Fortifying Your Financial Future:

A Global Approach to Wealth Security

Connecting the dots: Wealth Preservation, Cryptocurrency, Michael Malloy, EWP Financial, PPLI and EWP.

In today’s interconnected world, safeguarding your wealth has never been more crucial. Join us as we delve into strategies to fortify your financial future on a global scale.

Cryptocurrencies have been making waves in recent months. Let’s take a closer look at the developments in February and March of 2024.

Bitcoin, the flagship cryptocurrency, saw highs near $49,000 after the SEC approved spot bitcoin ETFs in January. However, February brought fluctuations, with BTC prices settling around $42,000 by month-end. Ethereum and other altcoins experienced similar volatility.

But how do you secure your wealth amidst this volatility? Let’s explore global wealth security strategies.

Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) offers tax-efficient investment solutions for high-net-worth individuals. By holding assets within a PPLI policy, you can mitigate taxes while enjoying the benefits of life insurance.

Michael Malloy, founder of EWP Financial, a pioneer in the realm of PPLI. His expertise ensures that high-net-worth clients understand the unique benefits of this strategy.

Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) provides a comprehensive approach to wealth preservation, focusing on privacy, asset protection, tax efficiency, succession planning, compliance, and flexibility.

EWP Financial, under Michael Malloy’s guidance, simplifies complex financial structures for the world’s wealthiest families, ensuring both wealth preservation and privacy.

In conclusion, the intersection of cryptocurrency gains, global wealth security, PPLI, EWP, and Michael Malloy’s expertise paints a vivid picture of financial empowerment in an ever-evolving landscape. Stay informed, adapt, and secure your legacy!

Disclaimer: This blog post provides general information and should not be considered professional advice. Consult with financial experts for personalized guidance. 

We are here to share our wealth of knowledge about PPLI and EWP.

Contact Us TODAY!

– The EWP Financial Team

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.
CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

~ Your best source for PPLI and EWP

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

CRYPTO – PPLI and EWP – Episode 4 – The EWP Stories Video Series

Cryptocurrency, Private Placement Life Insurance and Expanded Worldwide Planning

The Expanded Worldwide Planning Stories Video Series

Episode 4

Introduction

Welcome. Many investors in the crypto space have lost faith in some of our long-established institutions. These investors are looking for relevance in newer and more decentralized modes like the blockchain concept. At EWP Financial we embrace the six principles of Expanded Worldwide Planning, or EWP for short. These six principles are introduced in the opening paragraph of Wikipedia’s article on International Tax Planning.

This video will explain the six principles of EWP and how they help to safeguard your crypto assets and maximize them for tax efficiency, asset protection and privacy. A properly designed EWP Asset Structure can give you what no other asset structure can offer. These six principles are the key to the relevance you are searching for in your quest for financial security.

We include excerpts from an excellent article from Cointelegraph by Robert W. Wood that discusses some of the tax aspects of cryptocurrency.

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The major tax myths about cryptocurrency debunked

By Robert W. Wood
More crypto tax enforcement is coming, and many taxpayers are complying going forward, and amending prior returns if they have something to clean up.

Crypto and taxes may not be a match made in heaven, but taxes seem inevitable, and the United States Internal Revenue Service (IRS) has made it clear it is going after people who don’t report. With IRS summonses to Coinbase, Kraken, Circle and Poloniex, plus other enforcement efforts, the IRS is on the hunt. The IRS sent 10,000 letters in different versions asking for compliance, but all were nudges to encourage taxpayers to be compliant.

The IRS hunt for crypto has often been compared to the IRS hunt for foreign accounts more than a decade ago. Unfortunately, it is not clear if there will ever be a crypto amnesty program emulating the offshore voluntary disclosure programs the IRS formulated for offshore accounts.

Related: More IRS crypto reporting, more danger

The IRS made its first big announcement about crypto in Notice 2014-21, classifying it as property. That has big tax consequences, accentuated by wild price swings. Selling crypto can trigger gain or loss and be taxable. But even buying something with crypto can trigger taxes. Paying employees or contractors does too. Even paying taxes in crypto can trigger more taxes.

We are already seeing crypto audits by the IRS, and by some states (notably California’s Franchise Tax Board), and more are sure to follow. At least now, there are tracking and tax return preparation alternatives that can make the process easier than it was in the early days. Everyone is trying to minimize taxable crypto gains and to defer taxes where legally possible.

Still, it is easy to get confused about the tax treatment and take tax positions that may be hard to defend if you are caught. With that in mind, here are some things I’ve heard, that I’ll call crypto tax myths.
Myth 1
You can’t owe any tax on cryptocurrency transactions unless you receive an IRS Form 1099. If you did not receive a Form 1099, you can check the box on your tax return that says that you did not have any transactions with cryptocurrency.

Actually: Tax may still be owed, even if the payor or broker does not file a Form 1099. A Form 1099 does not create tax where no tax was previously due, and plenty of taxable income is not reported on Forms 1099. A Form 1099 might be wrong in which case, explain it on your tax return. But if you are audited and your best defense is that you chose not to report your transactions because you did not receive a Form 1099, that is weak.

Myth 2
If you hold your crypto through a private wallet instead of an exchange, you don’t need to report the crypto on your tax returns.

Actually: Private wallet or exchange, the tax rules are the same. The impulse to hide ownership by moving wealth to anonymous holding structures is not new. When Swiss banks began disclosing their U.S. accountholders to the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice, many U.S. taxpayers tried just about everything, but nearly everyone paid in the end, usually with big penalties. The cryptocurrency question on the IRS Form 1040 is not limited to cryptocurrency held through exchanges. If you say “no,” even though you hold crypto through a private wallet, you are potentially making false statements on a tax return signed under penalties of perjury. You might be betting that you will never get caught, but thousands of U.S. taxpayers who have Swiss bank accounts who can attest how poorly that bet can played out.

Myth 3
If you hold your crypto through a trust, LLC or other entity, then you do not owe tax on the crypto transactions and do not have to report. Besides (the myth continues), income generated through LLCs is tax-free.

Actually: Owning crypto through an entity may keep the income off your tax return. But unless the entity qualifies (and is registered) as a tax-exempt entity, the entity itself will likely have tax reporting obligations and may owe taxes. For tax purposes, LLCs are taxed as corporations or partnerships, depending on their facts and tax elections. Single-member LLCs are disregarded, so the LLC income ends up on the sole owner’s return. If your entity is a foreign entity, there are complex U.S. tax rules that can make you directly liable for certain income produced within the foreign entity.

Myth 4
If I structure the sale of my crypto as a loan (or some other non-sale transaction), I don’t have to report the proceeds.

Actually: Consider if you are loaning or selling the crypto. The IRS and courts have robust doctrines to disregard sham transactions. Are you getting the same crypto back that you are loaning? Are you charging interest on the loan, and paying tax on the interest as you receive it? Some loans may not hold water. And if you sell crypto and receive a promissory note, that may complicate your taxes further with installment sale calculations.

Myth 5
A crypto exchange is a type of trust since you can’t unilaterally change the policies of the exchange. So you do not own the crypto in your account for tax purposes and do not have to report transactions through an exchange.

Actually: The IRS has not said any of this. IRS guidance suggests that the IRS views taxpayers as owning the cryptocurrency held through their exchange accounts. It seems highly unlikely that the IRS would view crypto held through an exchange account as owned by the exchange itself (as trustee), rather than owned by the account holder. Taxpayers often own their assets through accounts held by institutions, such as bank accounts, investment accounts, 401(k)s, IRAs, etc.

In most cases, the tax law treats taxpayers as owning the money and assets held through these accounts. Some special accounts like 401(k)s and IRAs have special tax rules. And having an account treated as a trust is not necessarily a good tax result. Beneficiaries of trusts, and particularly foreign trusts, have onerous reporting obligations. Thus, before you consider crypto exchanges as trusts, be careful what you wish for. Calling something a trust does not mean income generated within the trust is exempt from income tax.

Myth 6
Congress’s amendment to Section 1031 of the tax code that limits like-kind exchanges to real property doesn’t make crypto-to-crypto exchanges taxable.

Actually: Section 1001 of the tax code provides that a taxable gain results from the “sale or other disposition of property.” The sale of any type of property for cash or other property can create a taxable gain. The IRS says crypto is property, so trading crypto for other crypto is a sale of crypto for the value of the new crypto.

Before the Section 1031 amendment took effect in 2018, a crypto-for-crypto swap might have been ok as a like-kind exchange under Section 1031. But the IRS is pushing back on this position in tax audits and has issued guidance that denies tax-free treatment for certain cryptocurrency swaps. That is not precedential and does not cover the waterfront, but it tells you what the IRS is thinking. In any case, now that Section 1031 has limited like-kind exchange treatment to real property, crypto-to-crypto swaps are taxable unless they qualify for another exception.

Takeaways
Every taxpayer is entitled to plan their affairs and transactions to try to minimize taxes. But they should be wary of quick fixes and theories that sound too good to be true. The IRS appears to believe that many crypto taxpayers are not complying with the tax law, and being careful in the future and doing some clean-up for the past is worth considering. Be careful out there.

This article is for general information purposes and is not intended to be and should not be taken as legal advice.

The views, thoughts and opinions expressed here are the author’s alone and do not necessarily reflect or represent the views and opinions of Cointelegraph.

Robert W. Wood is a tax lawyer representing clients worldwide from the office of Wood LLP in San Francisco, where he is a managing partner. He is the author of numerous tax books and frequently writes about taxes for Forbes, Tax Notes and other publications.

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Conclusion

EWP Asset Structures are tailored-made for holding crypto and NFT assets. At EWP Financial we welcome you to enter our world of satisfied clients, and find out what our simple and straightforward asset structure can do for you.

Take a look to our first NFT COLLECTION.

If you found this video useful, please give us a Like, and click on the subscribe button below. We look forward to having you as a client. Thank you for watching.

To learn how the wealthiest families in the world conduct their financial affairs, please call +1 530 692 1007, or email us at info@expandedworldwideplanning.com.

At your convenience, we can arrange a call to discuss how our unique blueprint can vastly enhance your asset structure. Contact Us.

Disclaimer

The opinions expressed in this video are for general informational purposes only and are not intended to provide specific advice or recommendations for any individual on any financial structure, investment, or insurance product.

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.
CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

The EWP Stories Video Series – CRYPTO-PPLI and EWP – Episode 1

Cryptocurrency, Private Placement Life Insurance and Expanded Worldwide Planning

The EWP Stories Video Series

Video 1

Celebrating a happy ending and a new great  beginning we want to introduce you to a fresh Video Series

Welcome. The blockchain concept has given birth to crypto currencies. This is a relatively new phenomena in our lives. Yet taxes have been with us since early dynastic Egypt and probably before. Recently passed tax legislation in the U.S. is a cause of concern for all those who hold crypto currencies. Similar laws are being passed by governments throughout the world. For this recent U.S. tax legislation, we include below excerpts from Robert W. Wood’s excellent article in the Cointelegraph.

What most of you don’t know is that there is a simple and straightforward solution to these new taxes that has existed since the 1980s. The beauty of this solution is that it is asset neutral, meaning even though crypto currencies are a new asset class, this solution wholeheartedly welcomes crypto currencies. For this solution, crypto currencies are handled the same as any common asset class like stocks, bonds, and real estate.

What is this simple and straightforward solution to the grave tax problem that is facing crypto currencies: Private Placement Life Insurance, or PPLI for short. But not just any PPLI policy. The solution is a PPLI policy that is structured to embody the six principles of Expanded Worldwide Planning, or EWP for short. Our firm, EWP Financial, was an early adopter of this powerful yet conservation asset structure.

This series of videos will give you the basic principles of a properly designed EWP asset structure. An EWP asset structure is the perfect solution to the recently introduced tax legislation in the United States that threatens to wipe out a good portion of your gains in crypto currencies. An EWP asset structure is equally effective if you are a tax payer in a country outside the U.S. In this video, Part One, we introduce you to EWP Financial and our unique approach to asset structuring.

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.
CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

PPLI and Cryptocurrency-Together A Winner

Expanded Worldwide Planning (EWP) Embraces Change

Updated

Properly structured Private Placement Life Insurance (PPLI) gives the assets inside the policy tax deferred growth for the life of the policy.  When the insured life/lives under the policy pass on, the assets pass as a tax-free death benefit to the beneficiaries under the policy.  If some of the assets inside the policy are cryptocurrencies, they also receive this tax-advantaged treatment. Essentially PPLI is more of an income tax and estate tax planning tool than it is a product.  Many asset classes are supported in an open architecture EWP structure.

We will discuss some more basics on structuring with PPLI in the context of EWP, then, something more on how cryptocurrencies and PPLI both occupy a similar space on the international scene for wealthy clients.

Any asset that can be custodied by a reputable trust company can go into the PPLI structure. Many policies are owned by trusts which can be domiciled in jurisdictions in keeping with the client’s planning needs. In terms of asset management, it is an open architecture model where the assets can be located in multiple jurisdictions with multiple asset managers. PPLI insurance costs generally average about 1 percent of the cash value of the policy, over the life of the policy.

The cost of the death benefit varies with the health and age of the insured person, and generally policies are designed with the lowest death benefit possible. Tax and enhanced privacy benefits outweigh the costs of using a PPLI structure. Asset management fees will depend on the asset manager(s) selected to manage the assets inside the policy. The policy is fully transparent to the client, as all fees and costs are disclosed.

How are cryptocurrency, EWP, and PPLI similar? All three have qualities that a wealthy homeowner would be looking for in an ideal home: architectural elements that truly “speak” to the owner; privacy; a climate that suits the owner; and a sense of security, both emotional and physical. These may seem like strange bedfellows, but what we all seek in the world, whether it is a home or a structure for our financial affairs, can be quite similar in nature.

We will illustrate this point by a few recent news items about cryptocurrencies:

Courtesy of Anne Kadet in The Wall Street Journal.

“NewYorkCoin, created in 2014 by an unknown developer, has enjoyed a surge of support in recent months. More businesses are accepting the currency and there’s a growing interest among cryptocurrency developers. There’s even a new Meetup group where enthusiasts who frequent online forums can gather in person to discuss their altcoin adventures.”

We all enjoy having a local identify and simultaneously having the sense of belonging to something larger than ourselves.  The NewYorkCoin, EWP, and PPLI have these characteristics.  The open architectural elements of EWP and PPLI can incorporate both the local and international in a structure that speaks to the client’s individual planning needs.

Courtesy of Mateo Jarrin Cuvi of Taxlinked.net.

“Israel’s tax authorities have decided to classify Bitcoin & other cryptocurrencies as property instead of currencies. How will this affect their taxation?”

We are not qualified to comment on the taxation issue, but wish to use this invitation post comments to raise a salient point: the use of blockchain technology as the basis for a currency throws into question the very nature of what constitutes a currency.  Or put another way, in the future will currency continued to be issued by governments or by individuals?  The answer to this question is being played out currently on the world stage.  In the meantime, if you are concerned about the tax on cryptocurrencies, you can use a properly structured PPLI policy to shield the tax.

For some readers we may have stretched some analogies, but hopefully we have equally stretched your minds on our topics.  We appreciate your comments and are thankful for your continued trust and support.

Learn more: The EWP Stories Video Series – CRYPTO-PPLI and EWP – Episode 1

 

by Michael Malloy, CLU TEP RFC.
CEO, Founder @EWP Financial

Michael Malloy-CLU-TEP